OUR STEM SISTERS

MARY RODGERS

Mary Rogers

Title: Senior Scientist

 

Age you knew you wanted to be a scientist: 9

 

Advice you would give your 11-year-old self: Keep asking lots of questions!

 

What's the coolest thing about your job? I get to find new things that no one has ever seen before.

 

What your favorite virus? Bacteriophage

REBECCA WILKINS

Women in STEM

Title: Director of Chronic Pain Therapy

 

Age you knew you wanted to be an engineer: During my undergraduate studies I wasn’t sure if I wanted to become a doctor or engineer, so I studied Biomedical Engineering.  I loved both the engineering and anatomy/physiology coursework.  Unfortunately, I witnessed a very serious bike accident on campus when I was 19, and realized that providing urgent medical care was not my path.  After that, I was 100% committed to engineering and have never looked back!

 

Advice you would give your 11-year old self: Raise your hand when you know the answer and have no fear when you don’t.  All is solvable through hard-work, perseverance and grit, and removing internal self-imposed barriers means ANYTHING is possible. 

 

Electrical Engineering Fun Fact: Our Abbott neurostimulator implants are roughly the size of a double-stuffed Oreo cookie and have nearly 10X the memory of the Apollo 11 NASA guidance computer that was used to land on the moon.

 

Read more about Rebecca Wilkins and how she combines electrical engineering and medicine to create life-changing technology.

GILLIAN MURTAGH

women in STEM

 

Title: Associate Medical Director, Diagnostics

 

Age you knew you wanted to be a cardiologist: 20. Growing up I was quite alternative, and people thought I wouldn’t succeed in a field like medicine, let alone one as tough as cardiology - so I set out to prove them wrong

 

Advice you would give your 11-year-old self: Study - hard. Being a nerd will pay off. You are tougher than anyone knows.

 

What's your favorite brain food? Italian roast, very dark chocolate, black pudding (it’s an Irish thing).

 

Favorite class in medical school? Anatomy, of the heart in particular – an amazing organ that I get to do research on every day.

 

Read more about Gillian on her Expert's bio and about how she is helping advance heart attack testing for women

CORLIS MURRAY

Corlis Murray

Title: Retired Senior Vice President, Quality Assurance, Regulatory and Engineering Services

 

Age you knew you wanted to be an engineer: 17

 

Advice you would give your 11-year-old self: Study hard in school, especially in math and science.

 

Sand castles or snow forts? Snow forts every time.

Alexis Roberts-McIntosh

women in stem

Title: Divisional Vice President of Innovation & Development in Abbott’s medicines business

 

Age you knew you wanted to be a scientist: 13 years old

 

Advice you would give your 11-year-old self: Engage in something that really excites you, something that makes you wonder and question everything.

 

Favorite chemistry subject: Medicinal Chemistry

 

Meet Alexis Roberts-McIntosh Ph.D.

ROSIE CARRION

Rosie Carrion

Title: Mechanical Engineer-Abbott Professional Development Program

 

Age you knew you wanted to be an engineer: High school

 

Advice you would give your 11-year-old self: Dare to try. Try new experiences and see if you like them. If you do, you’ve found your joy, but even if you don't you are one step closer to finding out what you do want.

 

How did you know you wanted to be an engineer? When I was accepted into a four-year Abbott-sponsored engineering program at my high school called Project Lead The Way. Each year covered a different discipline and involved numerous group projects. Meet Rosie Carrion

Oluwajomiloju (everyone calls me "Jomi") Babatunde-Omoya

Jomi Babatunde-Omova

Role: Currently enrolled in Abbott’s High School Engineering Internship Program

 

Age you knew you wanted to be an engineer: 15

 

Advice you would give your 11-year-old self: I would tell any 11-year-old girl interested in STEM that they should pursue that goal and prove to others that they are smart enough. There are a lot of times it will be hard, and people will doubt you, not believe in you or trust you, but you are going to prove them wrong.

 

How did you know you wanted to be an engineer? I didn't know that engineering was a thing until seventh grade when we went on a field trip to a college, shadowed engineering students and did problem-solving exercises. It was then I realized that some things I love, like math and science, could be made into a career. Meet Jomi Babatunde-Omoya

Dr. Upendo George

STEM

Title: Emergency Physician and Head of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at Muhimbili National Hospital in Tanzania 

 

Age you knew you wanted to be a doctor: 14 or 15 years old  

 

Advice you would give your 11-year-old self: Make sure to value yourself and what you bring to the world. Keep your hope alive and continue to pursue your dreams no matter what.

 

How did you know you wanted to be a doctor? “Initially, I wanted to be an engineer, like my uncles. Once I reached class 5, we had our initial career development exam, where I was asked ‘what I want to be when I grow up.’ I wanted to write engineer but was unable to spell it correctly. Because I didn’t want to lose any marks on my exam for incorrect spelling, I instead wrote doctor.” Meet Dr. Upendo George.

BETH MCQUISTON

Beth McQuiston

Title: Medical Director, Diagnostics

 

Age you knew you wanted to be a scientist: 16 for nutritional science and 28 for medical science

 

Advice you would give your 11-year-old self: Work hard and believe in yourself. Keep going. Persistence is key. You can do it!

 

What's your favorite brain food? Green tea and Pad Thai with tofu

CLAIRE BHOGAL

women in STEM

 

Title: R&D Director (ADC Witney)

 

Age you knew you wanted to be a scientist: I always enjoyed mathematics from a young age but didn’t really think about it as a grown up career until I was about 17. This was the age when I reduced the number of subjects that I studied and focused more on mathematics. It was the age when I first studied statistics as a separate discipline.

 

Advice you would give your 11-year-old self: My advice would be 'Carry on doing what you're doing'. I wouldn’t change anything about growing up, or the choices I made about studying and careers.

 

Favorite classic science experience: My at home probability experiments! I also had an inspirational teacher at primary school who taught me lots about the natural world. I particularly remember dissecting an owl pellet and raising indian moon moths from caterpillar to chrysalis to moth.

 

Her STEM career was a statistical lock. Now she's making FreeStyle Libre better. Meet Claire Bhogal.

SARAH VON KAMPEN

Sarah von Kampen

Title: Manufacturing Process Engineer (Nutrition)

 

Age you knew you wanted to be an engineer: My second STEM internship with Abbott I realized this is where I truly want to be. It confirmed Engineering was where my true passion was. During the internship I experienced the real pleasure in getting to the root cause of problems in order to solve them properly.

 

Advice you would give your 11-year-old self: Don't give up when it gets hard. Stay focused. The solution is always so much greater than the struggle it takes to get there.

 

Favorite classic science experience: In high school Chemistry we played around with chemicals and equations a lot - reactions, explosions, etc. - doesn't really get any more fun than that. Those experiences stick.

 

She's been around Abbott since high school. She's seen a lot. She's ready to see what's next. Meet Sarah von Kampen.

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